“X” – IT Outsourcing Vocabulary

  • X Window System – X Window System is a distributed, network-transparent, device-independent, multitasking windowing and graphics system originally developed by MIT for communications between X terminals and UNIX workstations. It provides the standard toolkit and protocol to build graphical user interfaces (GUI) on Unix, Unix-like operating systems, and OpenVMS €“ almost all modern operating systems support it. X provides the basic framework for a GUI environment: drawing and moving windows on the screen and interacting with a mouse and/or keyboard.
  • X.Org Fundation – The X.Org Foundation is an not-for-profit organization for the development of the X Window System. It was founded on 22 January 2004. The creation of the Foundation marked a radical change in the governance of X. Whereas the stewards of X since 1988 (including the previous X.Org) had been vendor organizations, X.Org is led by software developers and using community development on the bazaar model, which relies on outside involvement. Membership is also open to individuals, with corporate membership being in the form of sponsorship.
  • X.Org Server – X.Org Server, the X.Org Foundation Open Source Public Implementation of X11, is the official reference implementation of the X Window System, commonly used on Linux and UNIX. It is both open source and free software. The project is run by the X.Org Foundation and is hosted by freedesktop.org. X11R6.7.0, the first version of the X.Org Server, was forked from XFree86 4.4 RC2.
  • X/Open – X/Open Company, Ltd. was a consortium founded by several European UNIX systems manufacturers in 1984 to identify and promote open standards in the field of information technology. X/Open managed the UNIX® trademark from 1993 to 1996, when it merged with the Open Software Foundation to form The Open Group.
  • XAD – The XAD system is a open source client based archiving and unarchiving system. There is a master library called xadmaster.library which provides an interface between the client and the user application and there are clients handling the special archive formats. Three different types to handle file and disk archives and also disk image files (filesystem) are possible. They can be made by everyone. The master library itself includes some of these clients internally to make the work somewhat easier for the package maintainer and the user installing it.
  • XCMD: eXternal CoMmanD – eXternal CoMmanD(XCMD) is plugin protocol of HyperTalk which allows a user to develope HyperTalk command written in a language such as C or Pascal. XCMD is native code containers attached to stacks (as Macintosh-specific resources) with a single entry point and return value. XCMDs and XFCNs could be called just like regular message and function handlers from HyperTalk scripts, and were also able to send messages back to the HyperCard application. Some enterprising XCMD authors added advanced features like full color support (ColorizeHC, HyperTint, AddColor), multiple special-purpose windows (Prompt, Tabloid, Textoid, Listoid, ShowDialog, MegaWindows), drag and drop support and various hardware interfaces to the language.
  • Xcode – Xcode is Apple Computer’s integrated development environment (IDE) for developing applications and other software for Mac OS X. It is shipped free with Mac OS X. First introduced on October 24, 2003 along with the release of Mac OS X v10.3, it extended and replaced Apple’s earlier IDE, Project Builder, which was inherited from NeXT.
  • XDBX – xdbx is a graphical user interface to the dbx debugger under the X Window System. It provides visual feedback and mouse input for the user to control program execution through breakpoints, to examine and traverse the function call stack, to display values of variables and data structures, and to browse source files and functions. This program is old and is not being actively maintained.
  • XDM: X Window Display Manager – X Window Display Manager(XDM) is the default display manager for the X Window System. It is a bare-bones X display manager. It was introduced with X11 Release 3 in October 1988, to support the standalone X terminals that were just coming onto the market. It was written by Keith Packard. Because of its lack of configurability, users of GNOME, KDE or Enlightenment tend to use other managers such as GDM, KDM or Entrance instead of XDM.
  • Xerox Development Environment – The Xerox Development Environment was one of the first Integrated Development Environments (IDE). It was first implemented on the Xerox Alto in 1977.
  • Xerox PARC: Xerox Palo Alto Research Center – Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) was a flagship research division of the Xerox Corporation, based in Palo Alto, California, USA. It was founded in 1970, and spun out as a separate company wholly owned by Xerox in 2002. It is best known for essentially creating the modern personal computer graphical user interface (GUI) paradigm. From the early 1970s into the mid-1980s, PARC yielded an astonishing volume of ground-breaking hardware and software innovations. The modern mice, windows, and icons (WIMP) style of software interface was invented there. So was the laser printer and the local-area network; Smalltalk; and PARC’s series of D machines anticipated the powerful personal computers of the 1980s by a decade. Sadly, the prophets at PARC were without honour in their own company, so much so that it became a standard joke to describe PARC as a place that specialised in developing brilliant ideas for everyone else.
  • XFCN: External Functions – External Functions (XFCN) is a plugin protocol of HyperTalk, which is native code containers attached to stacks (as Macintosh-specific resources) with a single entry point and return value. XFCNs could be called just like regular message and function handlers from HyperTalk scripts, and were also able to send messages back to the HyperCard application.
  • XFree86 – XFree86 is an implementation of the X Window System. It was originally written for Unix-like operating systems on IBM PC compatibles and is now available for many other operating systems and platforms. It is free and open source software under the XFree86 License version 1.1. It is developed by the XFree86 Project, Inc. XFree86 consists of client libraries used to write X applications (“clients”), and an X server responsible for the display. Clients and servers communicate via the X protocol, which allows them to run on different computers.
  • X-Men Cartoon Maker – The X-Men Cartoon Maker was a recreational software package that allows the user to create animations with a minimal level of sophistication by utilising a library of backdrops, animations and sound effects from the 1992 Marvel Comics television series, X-Men: The Animated Series.
  • XML Schema – XML Schema, published as a W3C Recommendation in May 2001, is one of several XML schema languages. It was the first separate schema language for XML to achieve Recommendation status by the W3C. XML Schema can be used to express a schema: a set of rules to which an XML document must conform in order to be considered ‘valid’ according to that schema. However, unlike most other schema languages, XML Schema was also designed with the intent of validation resulting in a collection of information adhering to specific datatypes, which can be useful in the development of XML document processing software, but which has also provoked criticism.
  • XMLBeans – XMLBeans is a Java-to-XML binding framework which is part of the Apache Software Foundation XML project. XMLBeans is a tool that allows you to access the full power of XML in a Java friendly way. Using XMLBeans, you can take advantage of the richness and features of XML and XML Schema and have these features mapped as naturally as possible to the equivalent Java language and typing constructs. XMLBeans uses XML Schema to compile Java interfaces and classes that you can then use to access and modify XML instance data.
  • XMLTerm – XMLterm, stands for “experimental Mozilla terminal”, is a terminal program. XMLterm adds hypertext and graphical capabilities to the Xterm interface through the use of the extensible markup language (XML). XMLterm is open source software and is implemented using the open source Mozilla component libraries. XMLTerm is both a command line “terminal”, like an Xterm, and also a web page, like the one displayed by the browser.
  • XMMS: X Multimedia System – The X Multimedia System (XMMS) is a free audio player very similar to Winamp, that runs on many Unix-like operating systems.
  • XMMS2: Cross Platform Music Multiplexing System – Cross platform music multiplexing system(XMMS2) is a new generation of the XMMS audio player. It is a new design, written from scratch, separate from the XMMS codebase. While Peter Alm, one of the original authors of XMMS, was responsible for the initial design and coding of XMMS2 (late 2002 to early 2003), he has since passed on the responsibility of furthering the project to Tobias Rundstrm and Anders Gustafsson.
  • XOTcl – XOTcl, similar to Common Lisp Object System (CLOS), is an object-oriented extension for the Tool Command Language created by G. Neumann and U. Zdun. It supports metaclasses. Class and method definitions are completely dynamic.
  • XPCOM: Cross Platform Component Object Model – Cross Platform Component Object Model(XPCOM) is a simple, cross platform component model similar to CORBA or Microsoft COM. It has multiple language bindings and IDL descriptions so programmers can plug their custom functionality into the framework and connect it with other components.
  • Xterm – In Unix computing, Xterm is the standard terminal emulator for the X Window System. Xterm was originally written as a stand-alone terminal emulator for the VAXStation 100 (VS100) by Mark Vandevoorde, prior to the X Window System. A user can have many different invocations of xterm running at once on the same display, each of which provides independent input/output for the process running in it (normally the process is a Unix shell).
  • XView – XView is a widget toolkit from Sun Microsystems introduced in 1988, providing an OPEN LOOK user interface for X Window System applications. It has the same look and feel of the earlier SunView system, and provides a similar object-oriented application programming interface for the C programming language.
  • Xxgdb – Xxgdb is an open-source X Window System front-end for GNU Debugger (GDB). It was adapted from xdbx, which uses the dbx debugger.