“W” – IT Outsourcing Vocabulary

  • W2K: Windows 2000 – Windows 2000 (Win2K or W2K), part of the Microsoft Windows operating systems released in the year of 2000, is a preemptible and interruptible, graphical, business-oriented operating system that was designed to work with either uniprocessor or symmetric multi-processor (SMP) 32-bit Intel x86 computers. Windows 2000 comes in four versions: Professional, Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server. Additionally, Microsoft offers Windows 2000 Advanced Server- Limited Edition, which runs on 64-bit Intel Itanium microprocessors. Windows 2000 is classified as a hybrid kernel operating system, and its architecture is divided into two modes: user mode and kernel mode. The kernel mode provides unrestricted access to system resources and facilitates the user mode, which is heavily restricted and designed for most applications.
  • WAMP: Microsoft Windows, Apache, MySQL and Perl/PHP/Python – WAMP, an acronym for the combination Microsoft Windows, Apache, MySQL and one or more of Perl, PHP and Python, defines the Windows based Web platform. It is modelled after the more well-known LAMP, referring to the all-open source/free software approach which uses Linux instead of Windows.
  • Warez – Warez refers primarily to copyrighted material traded in violation of its copyright license. The term generally refers to releases by organized groups, as opposed to peer-to-peer file sharing between friends or large groups of people with similar interest using a Darknet. It usually does not refer to commercial for-profit software counterfeiting. This term was initially coined by members of the various computer underground circles, but has since become commonplace among Internet users and the media.
  • Watchdog Event Log – Watchdog Event Log is a file created by Windows operating systems using the .WDL extension.
  • Waterfall Model – The waterfall model is a software development process in which development is seen as flowing like waterfall steadily downwards through the phases of requirements analysis, design, implementation, testing (validation), integration, and maintenance. The Waterfall Model is considered old-fashioned or simplistic by proponents of object-oriented design which often uses the spiral model instead.
  • Web Authoring – Web authoring refers to the process of websites and web pages creation, or authroing. There is a lot of web authoring software available that enables the user to develop a Web site in a desktop publishing format. The software will generate the required HTML coding for the layout of the Web pages based on what the user designs. Typically, the user can toggle back and forth between the graphical design and the HTML code and make changes to the Web page in either the design of the accompanying code. Microsoft FrontPage is an example of the web authroing software.
  • Web Content Management System – Web Content Management System is a type of Content management system software used for managing websites. Usually the software provides tools where users with little or no knowledge of programming languages and markup languages (such as HTML) can create and manage contents with relative ease of use. Most systems use a database to hold contents, and a presentation layer displays the content to regular website visitors based on a set of templates. Management of the software is typically done through a web browser, but some systems may be modified in other ways. The Wiki system is a web content management system.
  • Web Page – A web page is an HTML/XHTML document that is included in a website. A web page is almost always accessible over the network or Internet via HTTP.
  • Web Portal – Web portals are sites on the World Wide Web that typically provide personalized capabilities to their visitors. They are designed to use distributed applications, different numbers and types of middleware and hardware to provide services from a number of different sources. In addition, business portals are designed to share collaboration in workplaces. A further business-driven requirement of portals is that the content be able to work on multiple platforms such as personal computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and cell phones.
  • Web3D Consortium – The Web3D Consortium, formally the VRML Consortium, is a member-funded industry consortium committed to the creation and deployment of open, royalty-free standards that enable the communication of real-time 3-dimensional (3D) graphics across applications, networks, and XML web services. The Consortium works closely with the ISO, MPEG and W3C standardization bodies to maximize market opportunities for its membership.
  • Weblog Software – Weblog software, also called blog software or blogware, is a category of software which consists of a specialized form of Content Management Systems specifically designed for creating and maintaining weblogs. Most weblog applications have features such as facilitating authoring and editing of blog posts or articles, various linking and web syndication features, and the ability to easily publish the blog to the world wide web.
  • Websphere – WebSphere is an IBM brand of products that implement and extend Sun’s JavaTwoEnterpriseEdition (J2EE) platform. The Java-based application and transaction infrastructure delivers high-volume transaction processing for e-business and provides enhanced capabilities for transaction management, as well as security, performance, availability, connectivity, and scalability.
  • Widget Toolkits – In computer programming, widget toolkits, also known as GUI toolkits, are sets of basic building elements for graphical user interfaces. They are often implemented as a library, or application framework.
  • Wildcat! – Wildcat! was a bulletin board system (BBS) software package developed in 1986 by Mustang Software to create dial-up BBS operating under PC-DOS. It was later ported to Microsoft Windows. By the release of Version 4 it was the basis for over 50,000 bulletin boards worldwide.
  • Windbg Debugger – Windbg is a multipurpose debugger for Microsoft Windows, created and distributed on the web by Microsoft. It can be used to debug both user mode applications and the operating system itself in kernel mode. It is a GUI application, but has little in common with the more well-known Visual Studio Debugger.
  • Window Me – Windows Me, also known as Windows Millennium Edition, is a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit graphical operating system released on September 14, 2000 by Microsoft. A successor to Windows 95 and Windows 98, it was marketed as a “Home Edition” when compared to Windows 2000. It provided Internet Explorer 5.5, Windows Media Player 7, and the new Movie Maker software, whichprovided basic video editing and was designed to be easy for home users.
  • Windowing Software – Windowing software, also known as windowing system, provides an operating system with the capability of displaying GUI windows. Windowing software allows a workstation’s screen to be divided into rectangular areas which act like a separate input/output devices under the control of different application programs. This gives the user the ability to see the output of several processes at once and to choose which one will receive input by selecting its window, usually by pointing at it with a mouse. It is normally one part of a larger desktop environment. Some windowing systems, like the X Window System, have advanced capabilities such as network transparency, allowing the user to display graphical applications running on a remote machine.
  • Windowing System – A windowing system, also known as windowing software, provides an operating system with the capability of displaying GUI windows. Windowing system allows a workstation’s screen to be divided into rectangular areas which act like a separate input/output devices under the control of different application programs. This gives the user the ability to see the output of several processes at once and to choose which one will receive input by selecting its window, usually by pointing at it with a mouse. It is normally one part of a larger desktop environment. Some windowing systems, like the X Window System, have advanced capabilities such as network transparency, allowing the user to display graphical applications running on a remote machine.
  • Windows 1.0 – Windows 1.0, released on November 20, 1985, was Microsoft’s first attempt to implement a multi-tasking graphical user interface-based operating environment on the PC platform. Windows 1.0 offered limited multitasking of existing MS-DOS programs and concentrated on creating an interaction paradigm, an execution model and a stable API for native programs for the future.
  • Windows 2.x – Windows 2.x is a family of Microsoft Windows graphical user interface-based operating environments that succeeded Windows 1.0. Windows 2.x was said to look similar to the original Mac OS and more closely matched Microsoft’s pre-release publicity for Windows 1.0. Released on November 1, 1987, Windows 2.0 allowed for windows to overlap each other, in contrast to Windows 1.0, which could only display tiled windows.
  • Windows 2003 – Windows Server 2003 is part of the Microsoft Windows operating systems released in the year of 2003 as the successor to Windows 2000 Server. Windows Server 2003 incorporated compatibility and other features from Windows 2000 and XP. Unlike Windows 2000 Server, Windows Server 2003’s default installation has none of the server components enabled, to reduce the attack surface of new machines. Windows Server 2003 includes compatibility modes to allow older applications to run with greater stability. It was made more compatible with Windows NT 4.0 domain-based networking. Incorporating and upgrading a Windows NT 4.0 domain to Windows 2000 was considered difficult and time consuming, and generally was considered an all or nothing upgrade particularly when dealing with Active Directory. Windows Server 2003 brought in enhanced Active Directory compatibility, and better deployment support, to ease the transition from Windows NT 4.0 to Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP Professional.
  • Windows 3.0 – Windows 3.0 was the third major release of Microsoft Windows, and came out on May 22, 1990. It became the first widely successful version of Windows and a powerful rival to Apple Macintosh and the Commodore Amiga on the GUI front. Windows 3.0 succeeded Windows 2.1x and included a significantly revamped user interface as well as technical improvements to make better use of the memory management capabilities of Intel’s 80286 and 80386 processors.
  • Windows 3.1x – The Windows 3.1x family of Microsoft Windows operating systems were released from 1992 to 1994, succeeding Windows 3.0. This family of Windows could run in either Standard or 386 Enhanced memory modes. The exception was Windows for Workgroups 3.11, which could only run in 386 Enhanced mode.
  • Windows 95 – Windows 95 is a consumer-oriented GUI-based operating system released in 1995 by Microsoft, and was a significant progression from the company’s previous versions of Windows. Windows 95 was intended to combine the functions of Microsoft’s formerly separate MS-DOS and Windows products. It featured significant improvements over the popular Windows 3.1, most visibly the graphical user interface (GUI) whose basic format and structure is still used today in Windows XP. There were also large changes to the underlying workings, including support for 255-character mixed-case long filenames and preemptively multitasked protected-mode 32-bit applications.
  • Windows 98 – Windows 98 is a graphical operating system released in 1998 by Microsoft. The new operating system was essentially an updated version of Windows 95, and like that earlier version, it was a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit monolithic product. Among its features were better AGP support, functional USB drivers, and support for multiple monitors and WebTV. Also added was support for the FAT32 file system which allowed Windows 98 support disk partitions larger than the two gigabyte maximum accepted by Windows 95. As in later releases of Windows 95, Internet Explorer continued to be integrated into the Windows Explorer interface. It was also the first version of Windows to support ACPI.
  • Windows API – The Windows API refers to the core set of application programming interfaces available in the Microsoft Windows operating systems. It is designed for usage by C/C++ programs and is the most direct way to interact with a Windows system for software applications. Lower level access to a Windows system, mostly required for device drivers, is provided by the Native API in current versions of Windows.
  • Windows Forms – Windows Forms refers to the GUI portion of the Microsoft .NET development framework, providing access to the native Windows widgets by wrapping the existing Win32 API in managed code.
  • Windows NT – Windows NT, where NT means New Technology, is a family of Microsoft’s 32-bit operating system first released in July 1993 and Windows NT 3.1. NT was designed for high end workstations and servers. It was originally designed to be a powerful high-level language-based processor-independent multiprocessing multiuser operating system with features comparable to Unix to complement workstation versions of Windows that were based on MS-DOS until 2001. It was the first 32-bit version of Windows. Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 are the latest versions of Windows NT.
  • Windows Server System – Windows Server System is an integrated set of server software from Microsoft. It forms the infrastructure for operating the back end of an information technology system. Microsoft divides its server offerings into four major categories: “Security”, “IT Operations”, “Applications”, and “Collaboration”. Many of the products integrate deeply with Visual Studio to help software developers and designers build solutions using familiar tools.
  • Windows XP – Windows XP is a line of operating systems developed by Microsoft for use on general-purpose computer systems, including home and business desktops, notebook computers, and media centers. Windows XP is the successor to both Windows 2000 and Windows Me, and is the first consumer-oriented operating system produced by Microsoft to be built on the Windows NT kernel and architecture. With the release of Windows XP, the Windows 95/98 architecture was finally discontinued. Windows XP was first released on October 25, 2001.
  • Wine Software – WINE Software, a free software released under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL), allows a PC running a Unix-like operating system and the X Window System to execute programs originally written for Microsoft Windows. Alternately, those wishing to port a Windows application to a Unix-like system can compile it against the Wine libraries. The name ‘Wine’derives from the recursive acronym “Wine Is Not an Emulator”, or “WINdows Emulator”. While the name sometimes appears in the forms “WINE” and “wine”, the project developers have agreed to standardize on the form “Wine”.
  • WinG – WinG is an API to provide fast graphics performance on Windows 3.1. It was later built-in to Windows 95. In Win32, the equivalent of WinG functionality is provided via API calls such as CreateDIBSection(), SetDIBColorTable(), BitBlt(), and StretchBlt().
  • Wings 3D – Wings 3D is a free and open source polygon mesh modeler. Wings 3D is available for most platforms, including Windows, Linux and Mac OS X, using the Erlang environment.Wings 3D is best suited for modelling and texturing low-polygon meshes, towards which its interface is geared. When compared to other open-source modelling programs such as Blender, its GUI is minimalistic.
  • Winny Program – Winny, also known as WinNY, is a Japanese peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing program similar to Freenet that claims to keep user identities untraceable. While Freenet was implemented in Java, Winny was implemented as a Windows C++ application. The software takes its name from WinMX, which is a peer-to-peer file sharing program authored by Frontcode Technologies and running on Windows operating systems.
  • WinRAR – WinRAR is a shareware file archiver and data compression utility by Eugene Roshal. It is one of the few applications that are able to create RAR archives natively, as the encoding method is held to be proprietary.
  • WinZip – WinZip is a program to uncompress files after downloading them on a PC running Microsoft Windows. Many files are stored on servers in a compressed format, making them take up less disk space, and reducing the time it takes for you to download them. WinZip decompresses these files, and makes them usable by the computer.
  • Word Processing – Word processing refers to the process of using a computer to create, edit, format and print documents. To perform word processing, a special program called a word processor is required, which enables you to create a document, store it electronically on a disk, display it on a screen, modify it by entering commands and characters from the keyboard, and print it on a printer.
  • Word Processor – Word processor is computer program that enables you to perform word processing functions such as creating, editing, formating and printing documents.
  • Wrapper Software – Wrapper software refers to a type of software that accompanies resources or other software for the purposes of improving convenience, compatibility, or security. For example, a wrapper is used to compress and encrypt software that is being sold over the Internet.
  • WWIV BBS – The WWIV Bulletin Board System (BBS) was one of the most popular dialup computer hosting systems in the online world during the late 1980s and early 1990s. One of its most unusual features was a proprietary networking system, allowing tens of thousands of systems running the software to link themselves together into various networks, much like FidoNet.This software started out as a single BBS in St. Louis, MO, run by Wayne Bell, who wrote it in BASIC.
  • WxWidgets – wxWidgets, formerly known as wxWindows, is an open source, cross-platform widget toolkit; that is, a library of basic elements for building a graphical user interface (GUI).