“U” – IT Outsourcing Vocabulary

  • UAT: User Acceptance Testing -User acceptance testing(UAT), typically the final phase in a software development process, refers to providing developed software to the targeted users to be tested for functionality. Software developers can do UAT by making the software available for a free trial to the public or by using an selected user group as a testing panel. UAT is done in order to get feedback from users to make any final adjustments to the programming before releasing the product to the general public.
  • UIT: User Interface Toolkit – User Interface Toolkit (UIT) was a C++-language, object-oriented layer on top of the XView graphical toolkit. It was developed by Sun Microsystems employees, but not officially supported by the company. The source code is freely available.
  • Ultrix – Ultrix is a version of Unix based on the Berkeley version, designed and implemented by Digital Equipment Corp (DEC, now part of HP) to run on their VAX and DECstation processors.
  • UML tool: Unified Modeling Language tool – Unified Modeling Language (UML) tool is an application software that supports some or all parts of the processes or the creation of the artifacts described in the software industry standard UML, which is used in the field of software engineering.
  • UML: Unified Modeling Language – Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a non-proprietary, object modeling and specification language used in software engineering. UML is a general-purpose modeling language that includes a standardized graphical notation that may be used to create an abstract model of a system, sometimes referred to as the UML model. UML may be considered as an extensible modeling language since it offers a profile mechanism to customize the language. If a concept you need is not present in the base language, you may introduce it by defining a stereotype.
  • Unix – Unix (or UNIX) is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by AT&T Bell Labs. Today Unix is split into various branches, developed over time by many companies and non-profit organizations, such as contributors to the GNU project. The present owner of the UNIX trademark is The Open Group, while the present claimants on the rights to the UNIX source code are SCO Group and Novell. The UNIX operating system was designed to let multiple users access the computer at the same time and share its resources. While initially designed for medium-sized minicomputers, the operating system was soon moved to larger, more powerful mainframe computers. As personal computers grew in popularity, versions of UNIX found their way into these boxes, and a number of companies produce UNIX-based machines forthe scientific and programming communities.
  • Unreachable Code – In computer programming, unreachable code, also known as dead code, typically consists of blocks of programming instructions or entire routines that will never be accessed because all calls to them have been removed, or code that cannot be reached for some reason. Dead code is undesirable for a number of reasons, but primarily because it suggests there is a fault in the software. Detecting dead code is a form of static analysis and involves performing control flow analysis to find any code that will never be executed regardless of the values of variables and other conditions at run time.
  • Upgrade – An upgrade, in computer industry, refers to a new version of a software or hardware product designed to replace an older version of the same product. Sometimes, upgrade means a better version such as a professional version with more functionalities and better performance to replace a lighter version of the same product.
  • Ups Debugger – Ups debugger is an open-source debugger developed in the late 1980s for Unix and Unix-like systems. It supports C and C++, and Fortran on some platforms. Unlike more popular debugger stacks for these platforms, ups is completely self-contained not merely a graphical front-end to lower-level debuggers like gdb (although some work has been done to make ups usable in that way). The ups user interface is built directly upon the X Window System and SunView, i.e. it does not use an intermediate toolkit such as Motif or GTK+.
  • Upward Compatible – Upward compatible, also known as forward compatible, refers to software that runs not only on the computer for which it was designed, but also on newer and more powerful models. Upward compatibility is important because it means you can move to a newer, larger, and more sophisticated computer without converting your data. An example of upward/forward compatibility is the specification that a web browser ignore HTML tags not recognised. Ignoring data or application instructions not recognized is the typical behavior of forward compatible systems.
  • USG Unix: Unix Support Group – Unix Support Group(USG) Unix refers to AT&T Unix commercial versions after Version 7, especially System III and System V releases 1, 2, and 3. So called because during most of the lifespan of those versions AT&T’s support crew was called the “Unix Support Group”.
  • User Interface – The user interface is the aggregate of means by which people (the users) interact with a particular machine, device, computer program or other complex tool (the system). The user interface provides two critical functions: Input, allowing the users to manipulate the system, and Output, allowing the system to produce the effects of the users’ manipulation. There are many types of user interfaces, such as GUI, Command Line, Web-based user interfaces, and touch interface, etc.
  • Utility Computing – Utility computing, also called On Demand Computing, is a business model where computer resources are provided on an on-demand and pay-per-use basis, while in the conventional model, the user need to invest to own the system. As the utility computing provider can spread the customers’ variance in resource needs, the utilization of the resources can be optimized.
  • Utility Program – Utility program, or utility, is a type of computer programs that support using the computer, an application or a development environment. Utility programs include file management, searching for files, comparing file contents as well as performing diagnostic routines to check performance and current health of the hardware. Utilities that support a development environment can perform a myriad of tasks.