“T” – IT Outsourcing Vocabulary

  • Tag – A tag, in computer programming, refers to a command inserted in a document that specifies how the document, or a portion of the document, should be formatted. Tags are used by all format specifications that store documents as text files. This includes SGML and HTML. It may also refers to mark a section of a document with a formatting command.
  • Tape Library – Tape library, also known as tape automation system, is a data storage system for storing, retrieving, reading and writing multiple magnetic tape cartridges. It contains storage racks for holding the cartridges and a robotic mechanism for moving the cartridge to the drive. Smaller units can have several drives for simultaneous reading and writing and may hold from a handful to several hundred cartridges. Large units support dozens of drives and hold several thousand cartridges.
  • Task Scheduling – Task scheduling refers to the assignment of start and end times to a set of tasks. Task scheduling may subject to certain constraints, such as time constraints or resource constraints.
  • TASM: Turbo Assembler – The Turbo Assembler (TASM), mainly PC-targeted assembler package, was Borland’s offering in the x86 assembler programming tool market. The Turbo Assembler package came bundled with the linker Turbo Linker, and was interoperable with the Turbo Debugger debugger. For compatibility with the common Microsoft Macro Assembler (MASM), TASM was able to assemble such source code files via its MASM mode. Turbo Assember is no longer maintained.
  • Telegard – Telegard is an early bulletin board system (BBS) software program written for IBM PC-compatible computers running MS-DOS. Telegard was written in Pascal, based on an unauthorized copy of the WWIV source code, and released in 1986, making it one of the earlier BBS packages for that platform.Presently Telegard is best known as the predecessor of Renegade, one of the most popular BBS software packages written.
  • Telelogic SYNERGY – Telelogic SYNERGY, formerly known as Continuus/CM, is a software tool for revision control (configuration management, SCM etc) of source code and other software development assets.
  • TenDRA Compiler – The TenDRA Compiler is a C/C++ compiler for POSIX compatible operating systems available under the terms of the BSD license. TenDRA uses the Architecture Neutral Distribution Format (ANDF), a specification created by the Open Group, as its intermediate language. It was originally developed by the Defense Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) in the United Kingdom.
  • Terragen – Terragen is a freeware scenery generator program for Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh developed and published by Planetside Software. It can be used to create renderings and animations of landscapes.It is popular among amateur artists, which can be attributed to it being freeware, its intuitive interface, and its capability to create photorealistic landscapes when used skillfully.
  • Third Generation Language – Third generation language(3GL) is a high level language designed to be easier for a human to understand, including things like named variables. Fortran, ALGOL and COBOL are early examples of this sort of language. Most “modern” languages (BASIC, C, C++) arethird generation. Most 3GLs support structured programming.
  • Three Tier Architecture – Three tier architecture, in Web system and service, indicates the three layers of web architecture characterized by web client – web server – CGI-gatewayed-backend server. The backend server (for instance, a DBMS) takes parameters typically embedded in URLs and returns html pages that it constructs on the fly. Plug-Ins and Java provide other interesting Web extensional architectures.
  • Three Tier Model – Three tier model, in client server architecture computing, refers to the framework in which the user interface, functional process logic (“business rules”), data storage and data access are developed and maintained as independent modules, most often on separate platforms. The term “three-tier” or “three-layer”, as well as the concept of multitier architectures, seems to have originated within Rational Software.
  • Time-Sharing – Time-sharing, in computer systems, is an operating system featured with allowing several users to run several tasks(multitasking) concurrently on one processor, or in parallel on many processors. In a system with time-sharing, multiple users could share a machine by using one user’s idle time to service other users. Similarly, small slices of time spent waiting for disk, tape, or network input could be granted to other users.
  • TinyOS – TinyOS is an open source component-based operating system and platform targeting wireless sensor networks. TinyOS is an embedded operating system, written in NesC programming language, as a set of cooperating tasks and processes. It is designed to be able to incorporate rapid innovation as well as to operate within the severe memory constraints inherent in sensor networks. It is intended to be incorporated into smartdust.
  • Top-Down Design – Top-down design, in contrast to the bottom-up design, is one of the software design strategies. In the top-down design approach, an overview of the system is formulated, without going into detail for any part of it. Each part of the system is then refined by designing it in more details. Each new part may then be refined again, defining it in yet more details until the entire specification is detailed enough to validate the model. The top-down model is often designed with the assistance of “dark boxes” that make it easier to bring to fulfillment but insufficient and irrelevant in understanding the elementary mechanisms. This approach to software design probably originated at IBM, and grew out of structured programming practices.
  • TOS: Tape Operating System – Tape Operating System (TOS) is was an IBM operating system for the System 360, used in the early days around 1965 to support the IBM 360 model 30 and similar platforms. TOS was a predecessor to IBM’s Disk Operating System.
  • TOS: The Operating System – The Operating System (TOS) was the operating system of the Atari ST range of computers. This range included the 520ST, 1040ST and the F, FM and E variations (e.g.1040STE). Later, 32-bit machines (TT, Falcon030) were developed using a new version of TOS, called MultiTOS, which was based on MiNT.
  • Trace Scheduling – Trace scheduling is an optimization technique used in compilers for computer programs. Trace scheduling was originally developed for Very Long Instruction Word, or VLIW machines, and is a form of global code motion. It works by converting a loop to long straight-line code sequence using loop unrolling and static branch prediction. This process separates out “unlikely” code and add handlers for exits from trace. The goal is to have the most common case executed as a sequential set of instructions without branches.
  • Trial Software – Trial software refers to software which consumers can try before they buy. Trial versions of software usually contain all the functionality of the regular version, but can only be used for a limited time.
  • Trigger – Trigger, generally speaking, is the cause of an event. In a database management system (DBMS), a trigger is an SQL procedure that is executed when a record is added or deleted. It is used to maintain referential integrity in the database. A trigger may also execute a stored procedure. Triggers and stored procedures are built into DBMSs used in client/server environments.
  • TrueSpace – trueSpace is a 3D computer graphics and animation software developed by Caligari Corporation, originally created for the Amiga Computer, and later for the Windows platform.One of the most distinctive features of TrueSpace is its interface, using mainly 3D widgets for most common editing operations.
  • TrueType – TrueType is an outline font standard originally developed by Apple Computer in the late 1980s as a competitor to Adobe’s Type 1 fonts used in PostScript. The primary strength of TrueType was originally that it offered font developers a high degree of control over precisely how their fonts are displayed, right down to particular pixels, at various font heights.
  • TrustedBSD – The TrustedBSD project provides a set of trusted operating system extensions to the FreeBSD operating system, targeting the Common Criteria for Information Technology Security Evaluation. The main focuses of the TrustedBSD project are working on access control lists, event auditing, extended attributes, fine-grained capabilities, and mandatory access controls.
  • TTA: True Audio – True Audio (TTA) is a free, simple real-time lossless audio codec, based on adaptive prognostic filters which have shown satisfactory results comparing to the majority of modern analogs.
  • TUGZip – TUGZip is a freeware file archiver for Microsoft Windows. It handles a variety of archive formats, including some of the commonly used ones like zip, rar, gzip, bzip2, and 7z. It can even view disk image files like BIN, C2D, IMG, ISO and NRG.
  • Turbo BASIC – Turbo BASIC is a BASIC compiler and dialect originally created by Robert ‘Bob’ Zale and bought from him by Borland. When Borland decided to stop publishing it, Zale bought it back from them, renamed it to PowerBASIC and set up PowerBASIC Inc. to continue support and development of it.
  • Turbo C – Turbo C is a Borland Integrated Development Environment and compiler for the C programming language. Turbo C has been largely supplanted by Turbo C++, introduced May 1990, for both DOS and Windows and later by Borland C++.
  • Turbo C++ – Turbo C++ is a Borland C++ compiler and Integrated Development Environment (IDE), famous for its ultra-high compilation & linkage speed – hence the term “Turbo”. It was a part of Borland’s highly popular family of compilers including Turbo Pascal, Turbo Basic, Turbo Prolog and Turbo C. Turbo C++ was a successor of Turbo C, expanding the compiler similarly to how Turbo Pascal 5.5 added object functionality to the earlier Turbo Pascal versions. Unlike Turbo Pascal, however, Turbo C++ always adhered to C++ language standards of its time. It has never been capable of compiling ISO-standard C++, however.
  • Turbo Pascal – Turbo Pascal is a compiler and a Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for the Pascal programming language running mainly on MS-DOS, developed by Borland. The name Borland Pascal was generally reserved for the high end packages (with more libraries and standard library source code) whilst the original cheap and widely known version was sold as Turbo Pascal. The name Borland Pascal is also used more generically for Borland’s dialect of Pascal. Borland has released three versions of Turbo Pascal for free: versions 1.0, 3.02 and 5.5.
  • Turbo Software – Turbo software refers to the series of compilers created by Borland International, Inc., including Turbo Pascal, Turbo C, Turbo C++, Turbo Basic, Turbo Prolog etc.
  • Tutorial – Tutorial, a term often used in the computer related training, refers to an instructional lesson that leads the user through key features and functions of things such as software applications, hardware devices, processes, system designs, and programming languages. The tutorial typically is set up as a series of steps that progress through levels of difficulty and understanding. For this reason, the tutorial is best followed in its logical sequence in order to understand all of the elements of what the user is trying to learn.
  • TwinText – TwinText is a HTML based Source Code Documentation Tool. It can generate HTML documents from a variety of programming languages, including C++, C, Java, IDL, PHP, C#, and Visual Basic. It runs on Windows.